Commercialization Fellows

Commercialization Fellows is an opportunity for engineering PhD students to take a deep dive into the commercialization process and potential real-world applications of university inventions.

The program supports Fellows financially so they can focus on the work, instead of dividing their energy between multiple projects. By doing this, Cornell is putting an emphasis on commercialization skills as an academic pursuit, instead of an extracurricular activity.

This program pairs Engineering PhDs and Johnson School MBAs. The peer-to-peer knowledge sharing mirrors what both groups will encounter in industry: the critical interface of research and development with business acumen.

Commercialization Fellows is part of Cornell’s commitment to support students as they turn ideas into impact. Regardless of whether the Fellows go on to a career in industry, education, or their own startup, they will be more effective because of this experience.

2018 Applications are now open

Applications Close 5pm EST on March 31, 2018

Upcoming Workshops

Perfect for startups and new entrepreneurs, these workshops — sponsored by Cornell Engineering — will give you key insights into different aspects of the startup process, launching and scaling, and building your team

Oct. 2, 3:30-5:00pm
Intellectual Property with Mike Russell

Oct. 5, 1:00-3:30pm
Building a Team with Steve Gal

Oct. 13, 11:00am-2:00pm
Mindset for an Investable Company with Zach Shulman

Oct. 19, 3:30-6:00pm
Partnerships for Startup Success with Brian Bauer and Steve Gal

Oct. 23, 4:00pm-5:30pm
 Financial Management with Tom Schryver

Nov. 2, 3:30-5:00pm
Presentation Skills for Entrepreneurs with Andrew Quagliata

Nov. 7, 4:00-5:30pm
Fundraising: Equity and Debt with Tom Schryver and Zach Shulman

Nov. 14, 1:00-3:00pm
Sales for Startups with Steve Gal

2017 Fellows

Hugh Bullen

Hugh Bullen

protected anodes for rechargeable batteries

A fluorinated polymer layer is used to enhance the cycling performance of high-capacity, lithium-metal batteries used in industries such as transportation and alternative energy generation. The coating is applied to a battery’s anode and this fluoride-rich interphase layer helps to control reactions leading to a boost in the battery’s performance.

Juan Guzman

Juan Guzman

Capro-X bioprocess

A unique bioprocess that can increase the value of bio-ethanol production by circumventing energy-demanding distillation. The fermentation broth from bio-ethanol production can be fed to the bioprocess to produce a high-value bio-oil that can be used as an animal feed supplement, replace chemicals sourced from palm oil, and be refined to manufacture plastics and pharmaceuticals.

Kayla Nguyen

Kayla Nguyen

electron microscopy pixel array detector

A four-dimensional detector used in scanning transmission electron microscopy that can produce an unprecedented amount of information about the sample that is collected at each scan position, including thickness, strains, tilts, rotations, polarity, atomic fields, long-range electromagnetic fields and orbital angular momentum.

Arna Pálsdóttir

Arna Pálsdóttir

supercritical fluid extraction of lithium

A new method for extracting lithium from brine sources, including traditional brines and geothermal wastewaters, that aims to replace the solar evaporation portion of the process to significantly decrease the time and environmental impact of producing lithium.

Thomas Wallin

Thomas Wallin

PMP stereolithography build window

A low-cost window substrate for commercial stereolithography 3-D printers that allows for the printing of polydimethylsiloxane (PMP), a silicone material. The window paves the way for new applications for 3-D-printed soft devices that require springs, hinges and soft robotics.

Catherine Wong

Catherine Wong

rapid-prototyping toolkit for robot controllers

A software toolkit allowing users to forgo manual designing and coding of robot controllers and instead use basic English vocal commands that the software converts into robot commands. The kit programs controllers that follow instructions without the errors and failures typically associated with coding.

2016 Fellows

David Agyeman-Budu

David Agyeman-Budu

confocal X-ray fluorescence microscopy

This X-ray technique can be used to noninvasively analyze the chemical makeup of an object. Agyeman-Budu will focus on detection of counterfeit electronics, pharmaceuticals and fine art. Similar X-ray implementations are energy-dependent and sacrifice resolution, but this technology uses a novel optic technique that doesn’t depend on the energy of fluorescent X-rays.

Amanda Bares

Amanda Bares

hyperspectral multiphoton microscope

The first-of-its-kind microscope can image fluorescent cells in living tissue using 48 channels of color information. Most multiphoton microscopes imaging at the same depth detect up to four colors. This technology allows a researcher to image a live mouse brain, for example, and see blood vessels, neurons, nuclei and various cells all in the same image.

Bill Bedell

Bill Bedell

infection-free insect cell lines

These proprietary lines of insect cell cultures could serve as the production basis for the first wave of commercial therapies that treat a disease by introducing genes, in the form of RNA or DNA, into a patient’s body. Similar gene therapies under development tend to harbor viral infections, which can be costly to remove from the cultures.

Mitchell Ishmael

Mitchell Ishmael

active energy storage

This technology intelligently manages different sources of thermal energy to inexpensively store electricity, helping to incorporate renewable resources into the power grid. Diurnal temperature swings can further enhance storage efficiency when storing electricity as thermal energy. This technology represents a step forward over conventional pumped-heat electricity storage units.

Bryan Peele

Bryan Peele

hyperelastic light-emitting capacitor

This system features a stretchable, rubberlike material that illuminates, provides tactile feedback and can be pressurized to form buttons, ideal for touchscreen interfaces, especially in vehicles where the driver needs to maintain eye contact with the road. The technology also has applications for wearable electronics.

Madhur Srivastava

Madhur Srivastava

signal processing denoiser

This signal-processing method uses “wavelet transforms” to remove signal noise and improve results of spectroscopic and imaging methods like ESR, NMR, MRI and CT. At significantly reduced time and cost, this denoising method uses features such as new noise thresholding formulas to improve available methods and will enable accurate studies in laboratory and clinical settings.

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